Katie Anderson

Artist based in South West Scotland; interested in people, places, materials and collaborative practice.

Tattiefields Public Launch

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It’s coming! After a few false starts and many delays, the new tattiefields artwork is due to be installed next week, with a public launch on Thursday, 13th September.

All welcome!

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Tattiefields: Developments

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Experiments with concrete

Sandblasting and stencilling in the detailed work for the new pieces going to the tattiefields site next month.

The patterns reference the original landscaping design, the artwork locations and the wider map network that makes up the tattie map of the world! (With Lochside at the centre, of course).

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Special thanks to Alistair of Grit ‘n’ Polish, highly recommended for any shot blasting requirements you may have. The stencils pick out really delicate details, with sharp edges and great focus.

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The particularly beautiful surfaces of the concrete are in the casting, made by the extremely talented Billy Teasdale, caster-extraordinaire based in Govanhill who has put so much time and work into completing the pieces in time for the installation.

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Final surface preparations to go ahead of the grand unveiling, on Thursday 13th September.

Zine Making Workshop in Stranraer

Young people of Stranraer! I’ve a zine making workshop coming up next month as part of the first ever Galloway Young Creatives Festival.

What is a zine? Self-published creative pamphlets or magazines, created using images, text, collage and much else besides. They are a unique platform for sharing your thoughts, ideas and inspirations with a DIY ethos. We will be working towards a collective zine, trying different techniques plus sharing tips and ideas for creating and circulating your own publications.

The workshop will run on Sunday 12th August from 3-5pm, and is suitable for anyone aged between 10 and 26.

Sign up here: https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/galloway-young-creatives-festival-zine-making-workshop-tickets-47814343990

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International Technician Day (everyday)

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The relationship between technicians and artists, and the artwork is an interesting one. For me, as an artist the making is intrinsically linked to the thinking, these are not separate actions – one to follow the other, but each ongoing, with one informing the other. A practice that is led by process.
Technicians play a largely invisible role in the artwork from a public perspective – however, without technicians, it seems that many artworks would not be possible, from works largely made by technicians, to those informed by discussions and the expertise, and knowledge that is held by the real technical experts.

I’ve wondered if this distinction between concept and technical skill has always been as separate. Contemporary art does get a bad press, as art education has stepped away from a skill-based approach, to a theory- and concept- based approach, but some of the skills – particularly casting and foundry work has been separate from that of the modeller or artist traditionally for much longer.
The etymology of technician goes back to the Latin and then the Greek (in case you are interested), Tekhne – which encompasses art, craft, skill, method or system of making – keeping the two very much intrinsic to each other.

But never mind the past for a moment, what about the future of the artist as a skilled maker? It seems that skilled based artists are back ‘in’ again, with artists like Phoebe Cummings and her elegant, spectacular raw clay works, and the resurgence in sign painters in the design world. But within the mainstream contemporary art world, most skilled works are still carried out by skilled makers – as separate from the artist-conceiver.

As my current work is to create a permanent piece of public sculpture, I’ve been really enjoying the process of being both the artist and the maker, but the technical support has been a central key for this work to be possible. The balance between control and responsibility allows the work to be more responsive, but also has to account for my own limited, if improving skill set.

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Bronze casting at SSW with support from the fab technicial duo, and artists Audrey and Yoon (on camera work)

I’m already looking to further expand my skills and technical ability following on from this project, (ok, I admit, this is always my goal) but has also opened up routes for a more collaborative approach to working with experts in the future.

Huge thanks are in order for a whole host of amazingly talented people who have been supporting me on the tattiefields project, with a big thank you to the stellar humans Eden and Uist up at the Scottish Sculpture Workshop for all of their support and calming influences during my residency last month.

Work is not done yet.
Stay tuned for the final results, coming soon!

 

 

SSW Residency: Tattiefields In Process

After a very manic and fast moving two weeks, my time at Lumsden is once again up. For the first time, my trip to the Scottish Sculpture Workshop was project focused – I arrived on site, with a list of requirements to be completed in 12 days.

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As usual, turns out I was pretty unprepared – and over prepared with all the usual unnecessaries – but basically, sand moulds are complicated. A thing of wonder and beauty, but complicated. (Thanks to Logan and Ralf on work experience for getting this started off).

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Wax room, in which I have a love-hate relationship. And the overly complicated nature of sprue-ing up pieces.

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Sand mould 1 week later – still complicated. Pantera is the incentive in the metal work department for getting stuff done quickly.

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Ceramic shells, each incasing hollow wax pieces built up in layers to create a solid (theoretically) mould for pouring. Lessons learned there.

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POUR TIME. Three pours, over two days. Huge relief to get these done successfully. Thank you EVERYONE!

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‘Hot potatoes! – Is this ever going to get old?’ Nope. Really, still hot – fresh from the shells.

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With a little cleaning..

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And a bit more. Next stages include sandblasting and patinating, the final colouring process.

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More details. (With the lovely Moomin soft focus in the background.) There’s plenty more to see –  I’m saving the best bits for the big reveal, and the few processes still to go through.

Stay tuned, more to come soon! #tattiefields

 

Postcards from the Past

As part of one of my ongoing projects for the new DGRI hospital in Dumfries, I have been gathering collections of objects, with connections from across the region. From artist made objects, to found stones and pebbles from across the Solway’s beaches, forgotten tourist tat and old memories of Dumfries and Galloway past, to new visions of the region as viewed by young creative groups in Dumfries.

I first stumbled across old postcards on an extended eBay hunt, and have since become a bit of an avid collector. As it turns out the inscriptions on the back are every bit as exciting as the images on the front, however in the final installation, the inscriptions will be sadly hidden to keep the postcards safe and in good condition for the future, under glass. The earliest card is dated 12th August 1903, and the most recent ones from the 80s.

Here are some of my favourites before they become hidden in their new homes:

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‘Just here for the day – the weather isn’t too good.’

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‘Have enjoyed relaxing while it rained’

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‘I went down for a bath’

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‘one good turn deserves another’

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‘We are hoping to go to Stranraer before we come home.’

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Tattie Planting

If you live in more Southern climates, (South of England/Ireland) the recommended best dates to get your tatties in the ground is somewhere between St Patrick’s Day and Good Friday. Given our latest weather in South Scotland however, you might think us mad to be starting off our first earlies already.

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We kicked off at the LIFT Easter Sunday event planting a variety of early breeds of tattie seeds, and will be doing some more in the near future – which we will announce, and hopefully once the cold weather has subsided.

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Our first early tattie varieties in full: Ayrshire Epicures, Arran Pilots, Duke of York, Maris Bard and Casablancas.

Some good things to bear in mind about your tatties:

  • Keep them watered, but not too wet. Potatoes don’t want to grow in a bog.
  • Potatoes also don’t like the cold. Even just keep them in at the backdoor will help them from getting frosted until this cold snap subsides.
  • Once they start to sprout you are on to something! If you start to see potatoes peeking out get them covered up with some extra compost. Green tatties won’t be any good for eating.
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Sunning our tatties before planting. To chit or not to chit? 

There are lots of different ways of growing tatties! In your special tattie grow bags they shouldn’t need a lot of hassle, but if you’d like to know more about growing tatties here are a few good places to start:

Good luck!
We will announce the date towards the end of the school holidays when you can bring back your tattie bag and we can compare the results, and select our winners. Dates will be announced on the Creative Futures facebook page, and the event will be held at the Tattiefields site on the corner of Carrick Road and Balcary Avenue, by the new Meadows houses.

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Good luck Tina! Thank you to Chris at Vault 101 in Annan for cutting our planter labels.

Like to take part? Live in Lochside? Please get in touch, as I will be doing another couple of events and can help you get started with a tattie of your choice.

What is Tattiefields?

Tattiefields is a site on the edge of the new Meadows housing in Lochside. The inspiration came from local stories remembering tattie howking in the area before it was built up, and this summer a series of artworks are being installed to share the history of the Lochside area. The project is supported by The Stove Network and DGHP.

Sundials and the Tattie Season

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I’ve been growing an interest in sundials and other seasonal graphs, marking the passage of time, the use of the land, the growing seasons and the lighting conditions. Subtle shifts in our everyday environment that can go un-noticed as the years gradually shift through changing seasons.

The recent wild weather brought with it a renewed awareness of our surrounding climates, as journeys were cut short, events and activities postponed, bread vanished from the supermarkets and the news flashed amber – red – amber. With the wintery weather, everything takes a little longer, and children gather on snowy ridges, in parks and playgrounds, rendered new, interesting and white. Our immediate environments and places become new – whitewashed, the sound deadened slightly by the weight of the snow. It’s good to see places fresh. As the weather recedes, temperatures climb, and the snow leaves – it’s good to hold onto the sense of freshness and awareness, the paths traversed and routes taken, the potential and possibility in the ordinary, that arrived with the first of the snow.

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This sundial stone lives in Dumfries Museum and is a beautiful piece, locating itself by surrounding landmarks and distant places, marking the calendar months, as well as the zodiac, and various others.

In creating new calendars and place markers for Lochside, I’m hoping to include not just significant tattie places near and far, but also the growing seasons for different varieties of potatoes. The growth of potatoes, adapted from the original homes in the high mountains of South America to suit our climates and changing sun patterns, measure the passing of seasons and the changes in the everyday, from early Spring right through to Christmas, if you plant your late varieties carefully.

The tattie season is upon us.
#tattiefields

Potato history lesson of the day

In Qorikancha, a city of the Inca’s in modern day Peru, featured a now legendary garden complete with gold corns on silver stalks, and gold potatoes. When the Spanish arrived, causing major unheaval and general carnage, much of Qorikancha’s gold was melted down and sent back to Spain before they ever learned of the cultural value of our humble friend, the potato. Small versions of vegetables, and llamas amongst other valued commodities were often cast in precious metals and given as offerings. Sadly, no gold potatoes remain.

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Picture: 1 of just 3 known life sized cobs of corn created out of a silver-gold alloy.
The garden of Qorikancha is in my dreams.
#tattiefields

Collections: Part One

As human beings, one of our more interesting traits is that of collecting, from the gradual process of gathering and selecting, through to our individual approaches of cataloguing, organising and eventually displaying. These can of course, be on a large scale, and done on behalf of communities and peoples, such as in museums, galleries, and shop fronts of many different kinds – and now the online purveyors of exactly-what-you-might-want-to-purchase-for-your-home, but the more interesting collections are those of the everyday, the individual collections of pebbles from the beach, mementos from previous holidays,fridge magnets, wine corks, postcards, pogs.

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This man apparently owns the worlds largest yo-yo collection, of over 6,000 yo-yos. Thanks internet.

We live in an interesting time, so overwhelmed by materialism and disposable culture, that I see the objects we chose to keep, collect, and save as imbued with an innate special-ness. These collections can come to represent us, to our friends and families, and to those who may find the collections after us, as representations of our place in this time. Even the smallest, and most insignificant of collections has a story to tell. Collections don’t need to be fashionable, they just have to be curious and loved. I’m slightly fascinated by the now highly unfashionable thimble collections, cases for which can be found in most charity shops, along with a large collection of mostly uninteresting thimbles from obscure British towns and faded seaside resorts.

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I’ve also held a long term curiosity about Cabinets of Curiosity, or Wunderkammer, (thank you University of Cumbria..), and collections that are neither ‘correct’ or ‘incorrect’, that have been gathered, grouped and collected in a manner inspiring and pleasing to the gatherer, creating an individual narrative rather than an accurate depiction of natural history etc.

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According to wikipedia*:  Ferrante Imperato’s Dell’Historia Naturale (Naples 1599), the earliest illustration of a natural history cabinet

But where is all this going? As part of an ongoing project I have started to assemble a collection of objects, made, found, gathered and bought, that will hopefully encourage a little closer examination, a little conversation, and a little curiosity as to their reasons for gathering and placing. I’ve also been working with artists from blueprint100, and students from the Dumfries and Galloway Art and Design courses to create some of the works for these collections which has been a really exciting sharing process. All the participating artists and students were invited to make objects that related to the region, and that were suitable, caring and mindful for a healthcare environment.

DSC_2196_lowres.jpgPewter cast object, by artist Agnė Zdanavičiūtė

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Slip cast conker from my studio collection
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Salt, gathered from the North Sea. Studio Collection

DSC_2203_lowres.jpgPewter cast key by artist Liam Templeton

It hasn’t stopped there. I’ve since been drawn back to eBay, madly collecting old, used postcards with curious snippets of tales on the back, cream pots and milk bottles, scrounging charity shops for old tourist tatt (whilst trying to avoid excessive mass produced plastics), my medal celebrating the last dip at the old Dumfries pool has gone in, as have other curios, pin badges, beach pebbles and seed heads.

The collections will be housed in bespoke designed cabinet-topped coffee tables, by Glasgow based design company, Dress for the Weather, and will hopefully be under production shortly.

If anyone has an old curiosities from the D&G area you’d like to see repurposed into a permanent artwork locally, from items of local history to tourist tat, please get in touch. I’d especially like to find some milk bottle tops – the kind that had the name of the area on them – or some pogs. Just because.